|◀ 1765 - 1776 of 1849 ▶|
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The British Parliaments decision to abolish the slave trade in 1807 had disastrous implications for plantation societies, such as Jamaica, in regards to the health and the labour of the enslaved population. Many of the Jamaican sugar planters could not accept the fact that the 1807 Abolition Act was a watershed moment which demanded a more conciliatory form of management and a willingness to implement critical labour reforms, such as task work. The failure to introduce these necessary internal reforms resulted in the continuing decline in the plantations crude production figures and in their productivity levels, despite the introduction of steam engines on many estates. The numerical strength of the enslaved population was also decreasing, and most important the health of the enslaved Africans was seriously declining. The planters failure to also eliminate their ambiguous management structure further hastened their own demise and the profitability of slavery in Jamaica.
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9789766402693
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9789766380144
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3455.00
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02
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Using a range of primary sources from imperial, colonial and local government records, Rockefeller Foundation Archives, memoirs and reports, this study provides the most comprehensive account to date of public health in Jamaica in the post-emancipation colonial period to the onset of the Second World War. The account is framed by two pivotal Jamaican experiences that were vital in precipitating significant policy changes at the imperial centre. An examination of the development of the part-time colonial medical service reveals it to be underresourced and inadequate. Most Jamaicans accessed Western medical aid through the Poor Law, a distinguishing feature of the British West Indian colonies, and the issues around the intermeshing of medical and Poor Law aid is a vital contextual question. Chapters on the epidemic and endemic diseases of smallpox and malaria expose the attitudes and the nature of the responses of government, elites and the medical services to such threats. The International Health Division of the Rockefeller Foundation was active in Jamaica from 1919 until 1950. A detailed analysis of their hookworm campaign, public health education programme and tuberculosis work contributes to a critical understanding of this philanthropic endeavour.

The contribution of Jamaica to a new imperial development policy, as exemplified in the 1940 Colonial Development and Welfare Act, is also assessed. A story of government and elite reluctance to finance public health services emerges in which Jamaicans were frequently blamed for their own ill health. Socio-economic causation was sidestepped as class and race perceptions, underpinned by the legacy of slavery, held sway.
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9789766403133
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9789768184948
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Paulette Ramsays study analyses cultural and literary material produced by Afro-Mexicans on the Costa Chica de Guerrero y Oaxaca, Mexico, to undermine and overturn claims of mestizaje or Mexican homogeneity.

The interdisciplinary research draws on several theoretical constructs: cultural studies, linguistic anthropology, masculinity studies, gender studies, feminist criticisms, and broad postcolonial and postmodernist theories, especially as they relate to issues of belonging, diaspora, cultural identity, gender, marginalization, subjectivity and nationhood. The author points to the need to bring to an end all attempts at extending the discourse, whether for political or other reasons, that there are no identifiable Afro-descendants in Mexico. The undeniable existence of distinctively black Mexicans and their contributions to Mexican multiculturalism is patently recorded in these pages.

The analyses also aid the agenda of locating Afro-Mexican literary and cultural production within a broad Caribbean aesthetics, contributing to the expansion of the Caribbean as a broader cultural and historical space which includes Central and Latin America.
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9789766405793
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The New Register of Caribbean English Usage"" is a pan-Caribbean publication which seeks to provide a representative sample of the development of Caribbean English usage since 1992, after ""The Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage"" was completed. ""The New Register"", which was intended to be a companion work to ""The Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage"" on a smaller scale, comprises about seven hundred items, including words with new senses or usages, acronyms, and abbreviations that have emerged out of the ecological and cultural domains of the CARICOM territories, from Guyana to Belize. ""The New Register"", like""The Dictionary"", shows the contribution of homeland British English to Caribbean English creoles which spread across the anglophone Caribbean as it merged with the hundreds of West African languages introduced during trans-Atlantic slavery to form those English-based Creoles. It also identifies the various levels of Caribbean English usage from formal to anti-formal and the various sub-levels of the latter. The continued inventorying and chronicling of Caribbean culture and history are vital in helping us to recognize and understand our unique Caribbean identity, and this is an essential reference book for students and educators in the region and in the diaspora. As well as being a practical guide to current Caribbean English usage, ""The New Register"" is a tool for raising the level of the production and use of English and for demonstrating the way in which Caribbean English works.
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9789766402280
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The late Wycliffe Bennett (19222009), widely regarded as the godfather of the Jamaican theatre in the second half of the twentieth century, brings all his experience and insight to this last, formidable production. Wycliffe Bennett saw almost every theatrical production of note in this period, directed some productions himself, and, in addition, worked as a manager and trainer in speech, radio and television. His wife, Hazel, co-author of this liberally illustrated work, adds her skills as documentalist and witness. Together, the Bennetts have produced the first book of its kind, a panorama of performance, from the imported touring companies and fledgling local elitist groups of the 1920s and 1930s, to the birth of the Little Theatre Movement during the war years; from the small, ambitious groups of the 1950s and 1960s to the thriving commercial roots theatre of the new century.

The book also chronicles the development of drama on radio and television, and Jamaicas small but important film industry. In extensively documenting and analysing dance, it considers modern foundation groups like Ivy Baxter and the National Dance Theatre Company, as well as their precursors and myriad offspring. A pioneer of the Jamaica Festival movement, Wycliffe Bennett describes it from the inside, culminating with eyewitness accounts of the spectacular Caribbean Festival of the Arts, Carifesta 76, over which he presided. As well, the authors treat music in all its variety, from classical through the Frats Quintet to reggae.

There are also sections by experts in their fields: Yvonne Jones Brewster writes on Theatre 77 and Barn Theatre; Dr Maria Smith examines Revival; Barbara Requa discusses dance techniques; and Mary Brathwaite Morgan considers the golden age of drama at the University of the West Indies.

To complete this panoptic view of the performing arts, there is an A to Z of the scores of outstanding personages in the different fields.

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9789766402266
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6900.00
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First published in 1976, work is a masterful analysis of the dynamics of slave labor in the economic growth of early-19th-century Jamaica.
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9789766400088
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|◀ 1765 - 1776 of 1849 ▶|
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